Images from Frank Romano’s library. While most conference attendees found some delicious rare type specimen books to study, I found myself with a cluster of fellow commercial printers excitedly looking through all 20 editions of the Pocket Pal. It was a very nerdy moment, with some of us taking “selfies” as we displayed older editions of the Pocket Pal. Yup. Had to be done. This little book lives along side Pantone swatch books in most press rooms, and has served print shops for generations. The 14th edition was shoved into my hands in the early nineties after a press operator become frustrated with my newbie questions. Press Operator: “Okay, we’re going to run this job sheet wise…” Me: “huh?” Anyhow, this book was (and still is) as ubiquitous as the ink knife in the print shop, and Mr. Frank Romano has been the man behind it for the last 30 years. 

Other pics are of pages from The Linotype Bulletin, an 1886 edition of the New York Tribune from the time the Lintoype was first successfully used in that print office, a 6pt Linotype Matrix containing a complete uppercase alphabet, and a presentation by Frank Romano and Rich Hopkins during which they discussed their recent books: Romano’s “History of the Linotype Company” and Hopkins’ “Tolbert Lanston and the Monotype.”

2014 American Typecasting Fellowship Conference Keepsakes 
Conference attendees are invited to contribute their own printing created for the conference, and in turn each attendee receives a “keepsake bundle” of some fantastic work. It’s always gorgeous stuff, beautifully composed and inked. Printers spend many hours on these pieces, the time and effort that goes into their work is inspiring. David M. MacMillan of Circuitous Root has documented the contents of this Conference’s bundle here. 

2014 American Typecasting Fellowship Conference Keepsakes 

Conference attendees are invited to contribute their own printing created for the conference, and in turn each attendee receives a “keepsake bundle” of some fantastic work. It’s always gorgeous stuff, beautifully composed and inked. Printers spend many hours on these pieces, the time and effort that goes into their work is inspiring. David M. MacMillan of Circuitous Root has documented the contents of this Conference’s bundle here. 

Rebecca’s finished keepsake for the ATF Conference print exchange. Type cast at the C.C. Stern Type Foundry during museum open hours, printed on the Vandercook SP15 at Stumptown Printers mostly after hours.

Rebecca’s finished keepsake for the ATF Conference print exchange. Type cast at the C.C. Stern Type Foundry during museum open hours, printed on the Vandercook SP15 at Stumptown Printers mostly after hours.

Well, the American Typecasting Fellowship Conference is over and we are back home and back at work. This year’s host was Frank Romano and the Museum of Printing in N. Andover, Mass. and the schedule was loaded with great presentations and plenty of social time to swap stories, gain insight, and also to eat. On day two, keepsakes were exchanged, and the requisite swap meet and auction were held. We are still looking though all the amazing work from people who attended, type beautifully cast and printed for the exchange. Mr. Romano opened up his personal library for a day of presentations, and Sunday saw many attendees at the open house at  Firefly Press in Boston, wrenching on the Thompson or poking around the excess casting parts.Thanks to Frank for all the hospitality, and to the other attendees from around the world who shared in the fellowship. There’s nothing like shutting down the hotel bar with a gaggle of other printers still chatting enthusiastically away about how to make the Monotype composition caster run more smoothly, or celebrating the charm of a certain Linotype face. Cheers!

2014 American Typecasting fellowship conference. Images from first day presentations at Museum of printing, North Andover, Massachusetts

The Amazing Mr. Chris Chen on Flickr.

The Amazing Mr. Chris Chen on Flickr.

The sidewalls on these Benedictine matrices are pretty rough. As a result, we’re casting a lot of hairlines. But, we’ve got our dental tools and know how to use them. That is, as long as they aren’t near teeth. Anyway, any chance to make sense out of Benedictine is a good one, I say. I can’t quite figure out how to use that typeface, but it’s fun to keep trying. 

The sidewalls on these Benedictine matrices are pretty rough. As a result, we’re casting a lot of hairlines. But, we’ve got our dental tools and know how to use them. That is, as long as they aren’t near teeth. Anyway, any chance to make sense out of Benedictine is a good one, I say. I can’t quite figure out how to use that typeface, but it’s fun to keep trying. 

There’s a lot of hot metal design happening in the shop this afternoon. See Rebecca’s post below. The photo above is a snapshot of Linotype borders and different ink approaches. I gotta rein it in, pick one and go with it. No persnickety “command z” action here.  Once a run is done, it’s done. Metal is cast and cut - there’s no going back. It’s a rewarding way to lay down ink. … okay, I think I’ve got it. Back to the press….

There’s a lot of hot metal design happening in the shop this afternoon. See Rebecca’s post below. The photo above is a snapshot of Linotype borders and different ink approaches. I gotta rein it in, pick one and go with it. No persnickety “command z” action here.  Once a run is done, it’s done. Metal is cast and cut - there’s no going back. It’s a rewarding way to lay down ink. … okay, I think I’ve got it. Back to the press….

Proofing 18pt. Monotype Ornament 1405/1405B/1405C (Cast at C.C. Stern Type Foundry, printed at Stumptown Printers)

Today’s Favorite Antiquated Office Product

Today’s Favorite Antiquated Office Product