The sidewalls on these Benedictine matrices are pretty rough. As a result, we’re casting a lot of hairlines. But, we’ve got our dental tools and know how to use them. That is, as long as they aren’t near teeth. Anyway, any chance to make sense out of Benedictine is a good one, I say. I can’t quite figure out how to use that typeface, but it’s fun to keep trying. 

The sidewalls on these Benedictine matrices are pretty rough. As a result, we’re casting a lot of hairlines. But, we’ve got our dental tools and know how to use them. That is, as long as they aren’t near teeth. Anyway, any chance to make sense out of Benedictine is a good one, I say. I can’t quite figure out how to use that typeface, but it’s fun to keep trying. 

There’s a lot of hot metal design happening in the shop this afternoon. See Rebecca’s post below. The photo above is a snapshot of Linotype borders and different ink approaches. I gotta rein it in, pick one and go with it. No persnickety “command z” action here.  Once a run is done, it’s done. Metal is cast and cut - there’s no going back. It’s a rewarding way to lay down ink. … okay, I think I’ve got it. Back to the press….

There’s a lot of hot metal design happening in the shop this afternoon. See Rebecca’s post below. The photo above is a snapshot of Linotype borders and different ink approaches. I gotta rein it in, pick one and go with it. No persnickety “command z” action here.  Once a run is done, it’s done. Metal is cast and cut - there’s no going back. It’s a rewarding way to lay down ink. … okay, I think I’ve got it. Back to the press….

Proofing 18pt. Monotype Ornament 1405/1405B/1405C (Cast at C.C. Stern Type Foundry, printed at Stumptown Printers)

Today’s Favorite Antiquated Office Product

Today’s Favorite Antiquated Office Product

Cal 20, Fleet 7 drink coasters for our friends on the Columbia River. Illustration by Andrew Roberts.

Cal 20, Fleet 7 drink coasters for our friends on the Columbia River. Illustration by Andrew Roberts.

Beer coaster print production for Fleet 7, Portland, Oregon.

The good team at Animal Traffic have been moving our made-in-Portland hats* through their retail stores like rain. Man, those guys know how to spot someone who needs a little p-town on their noggin. They just ordered a new batch from us, so the hats should be available again at their retail locations soon. Stop by an Animal Traffic near you to pick one up, or if you are out of the area, you can purchase one through our website  

Also, for you fans of typography: all hats are sold with letterpress printed tags generated from Linotype composition. The typeface is 5 1/2 pt Ionic No. 5 designed by Ohio born Chauncey H. Griffith in 1926 for Linotype.

* Patches are made here in Portland, out near the airport. The patches are applied to the hats by our friends in the neighborhood Queen Bee Creations The hats come from 3 different US makers from Texas and North Carolina. We haven’t found a Portland cap maker, so can’t claim they are entirely Portland made, but close… 

Another nice example of spot color design. The typeface is Ludlow Tempo Medium Italic. This image came from a Ludlow Type specimen book which contains many mock ups of “tasty” resourceful commercial spot color. Found here via the Internet Archive from the collection of David M. MacMillan / Circuitous Root. Thanks David!

Another nice example of spot color design. The typeface is Ludlow Tempo Medium Italic. This image came from a Ludlow Type specimen book which contains many mock ups of “tasty” resourceful commercial spot color. Found here via the Internet Archive from the collection of David M. MacMillan / Circuitous Root. Thanks David!

Yannick and Eric in the offset department are tearing apart my sweet old powder unit from the 13 x 18 heidelberg platen. They say they’re not going to hurt it. But I just heard a shop vac. And some laughter. Crap. They need powder reinforcements out there, I know. It’s hot in the press room and there’s some heavy spot coverage going down on some coated stock. I think they figured out how to use the shop vac as some kind of back up pump to lay the extra powder down. Must be working, because the presses are shuffling through the sheets. I’m not going to look at the state of my powder unit at the moment. 

Yannick and Eric in the offset department are tearing apart my sweet old powder unit from the 13 x 18 heidelberg platen. They say they’re not going to hurt it. But I just heard a shop vac. And some laughter. Crap. They need powder reinforcements out there, I know. It’s hot in the press room and there’s some heavy spot coverage going down on some coated stock. I think they figured out how to use the shop vac as some kind of back up pump to lay the extra powder down. Must be working, because the presses are shuffling through the sheets. I’m not going to look at the state of my powder unit at the moment. 

Today’s Favorite Antiquated Office Products

Today’s Favorite Antiquated Office Products